Keeping Up A Cadence

moving to a cadence
That weekly cadence can become a blur. Look into it and be more strategic. From Matthew Perkins Flickr photostream.

Well, it’s another week and the business cycle continues with a certain cadence. Business professionals flood inboxes in the early part of the week. Things let up by the end of the week even to the point of complete checking out on Fridays before the weekend.

When you examine how work is done, much of your load is interdependent. Other people place requests on you, thus it creates a mounting task list. We are not independent with our work. And now that our channels of communications are so wide and varied, we have to keep watch across multiple inputs.

In our connected world, you can merely be in reactionary mode or you can think about the cadence and tempo of work that people are involved within. Mondays may not be a great day to send your request. Your customer’s mind may be more free on a Thursday.

You can increase the probability of moving actions along with greater attention in the early and later part of the day rather than in the hustle and bustle of mid-morning.

So, if you are going to have to work hard at getting people to move towards actions with you, don’t underestimate timing. Weekly business cycles are real and if you can clue into the cadence everyone is generally working within, then you can become more efficient completing projects, closing deals and influencing others.

If you really clue into the cadence of your industry, then you can make a list of the strategic, proactive things that matter to you. Make that list and slot the activities of your agenda into your schedule when it makes the most sense and will make the most impact. Do it every week. In this way, you are making your work count more than with a random approach based on your timing.

Want better results? Slot in your important work based on cadence.