I Like the Boring Business

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When it comes to business building, I like boring. I like creating outputs from inputs. I like throughput. Drama, inconsistencies, high stress and heroics are fantastic for movie plots. But they don’t contribute positively to profit and loss in a business. Boring helps cash flow. Cash flow makes customers, vendors, employees, and owners happy.

I am not sure why a certain level of craziness persists for so many operations. Here are my guesses:

A business owner thinks a bit of chaos is normal.

Employees have completely different incentives. Chaos and disorder might reward them with a sense of relevance (and dependency).

Growing so fast with headcount and lacking a solid culture has newcomers confused.

The business owner only cares about money and doesn’t realize the importance of strategy to get money long-term.

There’s not enough drama going on in people’s personal lives.

When I see a boring business that has cash flow working like a machine, someone prioritized making the business work and keeping first things first. They simplified as they grew. New systems, processes and people create complexity. And they were intentional to inject strategies, culture and execution to overcome the complexity. It was more than a money grab.

With the ridiculous amount of competition out there, the last thing you need is chaos and drama when it comes to operations and selling. Making customers happy requires alignment internally on all fronts. Perhaps certain niches can hide for a bit. But, someone is going to eat your lunch that comes along and builds that boring business that reliably executes day in and day out.

Are you operating on systems or charisma?

Do you have consistency or failure points that keep showing up?

Are customers leaving you regularly?

Are employees leaving you disgruntled?

Do you think chaos is normal?

The marketplace is moving so fast and commoditizing every sector. Focus on building the boring business so you can be agile enough to react. It’s hard enough out there.

Here’s How You Build Trust With Clients

It’s hard living in an imperfect world, especially with people that might expect perfectionism. Perfectionism is not realistic. There are too many variables, players on the field and unrealistic expectations to muddy the waters of doing good business.

But, being in the connected human economy affords us the opportunity to work with imperfection and even build trust through it all by simply communicating well.

If you want to build trust with clients, as a given, execute well. However, when you can’t deliver, communicate. It’s how I have built trust with clients for many years and it astounds me how poor most people are at communicating timely, honestly and with leadership. In the end, it does take leadership and guts.

Don’t hide. Don’t rationalize. Don’t wait for your client to dictate. Don’t be a coward.

I overcommunicate all the time.

I educate clients and ensure they are comfortable.

I listen carefully and dial into how clients like to be communicated with.

And it keeps things from building up into unnecessary crises. You can stay ahead of most things by addressing issues, being clear and being humble.

I can’t say it enough, when you can’t deliver, communicate. You will easily stand apart from other service providers and the many other options of people out there trying to deliver value. You will build trust by being transparent and leading.

Trust is hard to build and easy to lose. So, unless you want to churn through relationships, you can work on this specific skill and ensure your communications, whether in writing or verbally, always focuses on problem-solving, empathy and goals.

Trying to be perfect is not realistic. But trying to be more human and leading proactively with care can even turn problems into amazing opportunities for connection as you get on the same side of the table with those you serve. You get to go down the journey together with your clients this way.

Selling By Systems Not By Sweat

There is a story of a mountain village which experienced an unforgiving drought. The condition was deteriorating to the point that a village elders’ meeting was held. They decided to hire two men to solve the problem of bringing water to the village from the valley below where a well existed.

The first man got two large buckets and started going back and forth from the village to the well below. He sold the water at a handsome price. He brought his sons on board to the venture and made as many trips as possible to sell his water. Continue reading